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20121207
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speaker john boehner's response, no way. they are, he said, at stalemate. >> the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal, and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new taxes, calls for a little -- not even $400 billion in cuts, and they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it was not a serious proposal. and so right now we're almost nowhere. gwen: both ends say americans voted for growth and responsibility during the last election, but each apparently is read looking the same message differently. what a surprise. so how much of the policy is about standoff and how much is about politics? >> it's a little bit of each. but i would have to say right now it's a lot about politics and it's a lot about political theater. you just showed these guys. ok, so they have given their opening round. we all know where they stand. this is for the base of their parties now, which the president, of course, has been meeting with his liberal base, republicans have been meeting with conservatives who say do
interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6
john boehner also spoke to president obama on the phone last night. he said he wanted to know where the administration would rein in spending, but that he had heard nothing new. >> i was hopeful we'd see a specific plan for cutting spending. we sought to find out today what the president is really willing to do. listen, i remain hopeful that productive conversations in the days ahead can be had but the white house has to get serious. >> sreenivasan: senate minority leader mitch mcconnell echoed that complaint. in a statement, he said, "today, they took a step backward and significantly closer to the cliff." conversely, white house spokesman jay carney charged republicans failed to provide any details on what they could tolerate in the way of tax increases. >> the president has always engaged in this with real numbers. when you talk about flexibility on revenue, all we've heard so far and it's welcomed, don't get me wrong, but we've heard that yes, revenue on the table but we need more than that. >> sreenivasan: away from the microphones, there were reports of possible movement. an a
speaker john boehner emerged from his sit- down with the president's negotiating team to declare he was disappointed. two weeks after the election, the speaker said democrats have yet to show what he called "adult leadership." >> right now, all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it's time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really willing to make. >> reporter: that's not how the white house sees it. the administration called the republican position that tax rates should not change implausible after the election. and the white house warned republicans against using the debt limit as leverage to force agreement. >> asking for... that a political price be paid in order for congress to do its job, to ensure that the united states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history, is deeply irresponsible. >> reporter: at least talks are going on. the speaker and the president spoke by phone for almost half an hour last night. but a first
even as house speaker john boehner declares the negotiations are "going nowhere." >> brown: then, we turn to another congressional battle. kwame holman reports on sparring in the senate over proposals to change rules blamed for partisan gridlock. >> majority democrats want to put limits on the phil buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>
to the white house today, speaker of the house john boehner rejected the president's approach, writing that republicans cannot in good conscience agree to this approach which is neither balanced nor realistic. his counter-offer, save $2.2 trillion by among other things raising $800 billion in new revenues. the plan would also raise the future eligibility age for medicare and alter medicaid to save another $600 billion. the republican plan would not increase tax rates for the wealthy. the president is campaigning for his plan, taking questions on twitter today, and releasing this new web video. >> under my plan, first of all, 98% of folks who make less than $250,000, you wouldn't see your income taxes go up a single dime. all right? because you're the ones who need relief. >> ifill: treasury secretary timothy geithner met with congressional leaders last week and pressed the administration's case in a series of talk show appearances this weekend. >> rates are going to have to go up on the wealthiest americans. those rates are going to have to go up. >> there's no possibility that we're g
goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> rose: and here is the president talking about why it's essential for him that there be tax increases for the most wealthy among us. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're
really appreciate it. did you get the sense from house speaker boehner, he is ready to make a deal? >> i would say there is a recognition on all sides about the significance and importance of a deal. it is a real question about getting both sides en the room to actually hammer it out and get something done because we don't have a lot of time left. >> susie: president obama said he would like to have a deal by christmas. from what you heard today, how realistic is that? >> if they want to, they can get this done in a couple of days. it is just a matter of kind of working out some of these important details. but it's a matter, i think, they just need to get together and get started. i think both recognize the need for a market-credible $4 trillion deal, and it has got to comprise both tax increases that are believable and that will happen, and entitlement reform that is believable and will happen. both of those things will have to be an important part of this. >> susie: did speaker boehner talk more specifically about what would be acceptable to his party? did he talk to you about that? >>
has put forth an offer and speaker john boehner has put forth that offer. the fact that this is rejected is to be expected but it is testing ground. we have seen that between them have gone through this process. i believe we will get there. both sides so that we cannot win are refusing to compromise. we both have our right to be here and we have countered with some revenue in places. we want to see what the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -- do not want to cut spending. >> the president has the political upper hand. if nothing happens, the tax rates do expire as is and they go up and the sequestration of takes place. he can vote -- publicly blame that on republicans to. he would have the upper hand. policy-wise east as -- he has to combat and ask for an increase in the debt ceiling. he knows that if he sours the atmosphere right
revenues by closing loopholes and capping deductions. and this morning, house speaker john boehner said he'd reinforced that position to congressman cole. >> you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. it'll hurt small businesses, it'll hurt our economy, it's why it's not the right approach. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> brown: despite the president's talk of changing minds, "politico's" manu raju says that privately, house republicans think they can win this fight. >> right now the republican leadership feels pretty confident that they have most of their folks in line. they all generally support keeping tax rates low for virtually for every single income group. they do not want to see incomes increase for that top tax bracket. >> brown: meanwhile, on the senate floor, minority leader mitch mcconnell criticized democrats for putting social security off limits in any deficit deal. >> as for social security, the only thing we hear from why in the world wouldn't they want to talk about the fact that this
, we heard late today that there was a phone conversation between the president and speaker boehner. have you heard anything about that? >> no, i haven't. i've been in multiple conversations today about this. but i've been in a meeting until right now for the last two hours. so i have not been aware of the phone conversation. sphwhrood well, we not hearing any reports other than the fact the call took place, but the fact that it took place, is that good news? >> oh, i don't know, judy. i think there are a the love discussions about what is the best way to get the type of entitlement reforms that everyone knows needs to take place, both republicans and democrats. judy, i have been in i don't know how many meetings in the last two years where there is a lot of commonality around the issue. as you know, the president has been, you know, sort of a-- not to be pejorative, but sort of a one-trick pony on this tax rate increase issue. what that's doing is putting all the focus on revenues, and no doubt, the american people are concerned about maybe being hostages, if you will, with tax inc
.b.r." >> susie: the fiscal cliff talks are going nowhere. that's the word from john boehner today. the house speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they wa
secretary timothy geithner meeting with top republicans. this afternoon, house speaker john boehner sketched out the g.o.p. proposal in a letter to the white house, and the proposal borrows suggestions from the president's own debt reduction commission, whose plan was ignored last year. the republican letter offered $900 billion in spending cuts from program reforms to medicare and social security. the g.o.p. plan would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill." it's not just the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as
connell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president now has an obligation to respond with a proposal that can pass both chambers of congress." >> susie: we turn tonight to other opinions on the fiscal cliff impasse. we talk with the chairman of the national governor's association, and we also hear from a leading advocate for responsible fiscal policy. we begin with governor jack markell, the democrat from delaware. he was one of six governors meeting with president obama today to talk about how the fiscal cliff impacts their states. i asked him what was his message to the president. >> our message was pretty straightforward. we believe that it is important that governors have a seat at the table as the president and leaders in congress are negotiating issues around the fiscal cliff. we think it is really important that they get something done because, obviously, if tax rates go up on middle-class americans come next month, it will be bad for those middle-class americans, it is will be bad
the president spoke by telephone with house speaker john boehner. no specifics on what they said to each other, but it was their first conversation in a week. eventually the two sides will get down to bargaining over specifics, including entitlements. one idea may be to change the way the government measures inflation. that may sound like a small change, but, as darren gersh reports, it could have a big impact. >> reporter: if the price of oranges goes up, consumers will buy apples and other cheaper foods. we know that. economists call that switching "substitution," but that change in behavior doesn't show up in the official inflation rate. so most economists think the current consumer price index overstates the actual cost of living. that's important because the inflation rate is used to set tax brackets and social security benefits. moving to a more accurate inflation measure called the "chained c.p.i." would cut the deficit by $200 billion over ten years. supporters say the change wouldn't cut benefits. >> if we're making the change to reflect what is the real cost of living, as opposed to
going up. >> woodruff: the president phoned house speaker john boehner yesterday, their first direct talk in almost a week. but today white house spokesman jay carney wouldn't share details of the call. >> we believe it's in the interest of achieving an agreement not to do that. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner said yesterday the white house was absolutely willing to go over the cliff if republicans held firm in their opposition to raising rates on the wealthy. but it was the administration's other demand-- to give the president authority over the nation's debt ceiling that roiled tempers on capitol hill. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell tried yesterday to force a vote on the issue, assuming republicans would prevail. >> look, the only way we ever cut spending around here is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut altogether. it gets in the way of his spending plans. i assure you, it's not going to happen. >> reporter: but when majority leader harry reid took him up on the offer today, mcconnell backed
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)